Question: Who Said An Unjust Law Is No Law?

Is it justified to break an unjust law?

Thus, breaking the law becomes a necessity and can be justified because one cannot simply endure such unjust law.

Moreover, one has a moral responsibility to disobey the unjust laws, and to do so, such laws must be broken..

Are we morally obligated to obey an unjust law?

citizens are morally obligated to obey unjust laws (unless otherwise specified).

Is there an obligation to obey the law?

But a legalistic view that has proponents is the one that states that there is a prima facie legal obligation to obey the law because the law is the law and it ought to be obeyed except in circumstances where the law permits disobedience. In either case, it is a legal duty to obey political authority that we have.

What is the eternal law?

Eternal law is comprised of those laws that govern the nature of an eternal universe. It is the law which God in the creation of man infused into him for his direction and preservation. … An unjust law is a human law that is not rooted in eternal law.

What is an example of an unjust law?

There are many unjust laws around the world, the most obvious being those that discriminate between the rights given to different groups. In the United States, the most egregious examples tend to be on a state rather than on a federal level. Examples include laws denying equal treatment to homosexuals.

What did Martin Luther King say about unjust laws?

“One has not only a legal, but a moral responsibility to obey just laws. Conversely, one has a moral responsibility to disobey unjust laws.” Read more quotes from Martin Luther King Jr.

What should a citizen do about an unjust law?

What should a citizen do about an unjust law? “If it is of such a nature that it requires you to be the agent of an injustice to another, then, I say, break the law.” “If one honest man… ceasing to hold slaves, were actually to withdraw from this copartnership…it would be the abolition of slavery in America.”

What is the definition of unjust?

1 : characterized by injustice : unfair. 2 archaic : dishonest, faithless.

Is every unjust law an appropriate target for civil disobedience?

Is every unjust law an appropriate target for civil disobedience? No, civil disobedience would prove ineffective for certain laws.

Who said if a law is unjust?

Thomas JeffersonIf a law is unjust, a man is not only right to disobey it, he is obligated to do so. – Thomas Jefferson.

Did Thomas Jefferson say if a law is unjust?

“If a law is unjust a man is not only right to disobey it, he is obligated to do so” – Thomas Jefferson.

What is the moral law?

: a general rule of right living especially : such a rule or group of rules conceived as universal and unchanging and as having the sanction of God’s will, of conscience, of man’s moral nature, or of natural justice as revealed to human reason the basic protection of rights is the moral law based on man’s dignity — …

What does an unjust law is no law at all mean?

An unjust law is a code that is out of harmony with the moral law. To put it in the terms of St. Thomas Aquinas: An unjust law is a human law that is not rooted in eternal law and natural law. Any law that uplifts human personality is just. Any law that degrades human personality is unjust.”

Is an unjust law a law?

Thomas Aquinas to make the distinction between just and unjust laws. “A just law is a man-made code that squares with the moral law or the law of God. An unjust law is a code that is out of harmony with the moral law,” King responded. “One has not only a legal but a moral responsibility to obey just laws.

What makes something unjust?

Being in violation of principles of justice or fairness; unfair. An unjust law. The definition of unjust is something unfair or not morally right. If an innocent man is found guilty because the police lied, this is an example of an unjust verdict.

Do not follow unjust laws?

“One has not only a legal, but a moral responsibility to obey just laws. Conversely, one has a moral responsibility to disobey unjust laws.” – Martin Luther King, Jr.