What Does As Fit As A Fiddle Mean?

What does get real mean?

informal.

used for telling someone that they should try to understand the true facts of a situation and not hope for what is impossible: Get real.

He’s never going to give you the money..

What does the idiom fit as a fiddle mean?

informal. : in good physical condition : very healthy and strong I feel (as) fit as a fiddle this morning.

Where does as fit as a fiddle come from?

The phrase fit as a fiddle dates back to the 1600s in British English, but had a slightly different meaning then. The word fit had as its primary meaning ‘well-suited, apt for a particular purpose’.

How would you use fit as a fiddle in a sentence?

Examples:My grandfather is 90 years old, but he is as fit as a fiddle.She had fallen very ill, but with rest and medication, she is now fit as a fiddle.The team had partied late into the night, but on match day, each of them was as fit as a fiddle.After a refreshing vacation by the sea, I now feel fit as a fiddle.More items…

What does as fit as a butcher’s dog mean?

The phrase “as fit as a butcher’s dog” means a person is extremely fit and healthy even in a challenging situation. In fact, the allusion shows that a butcher’s dog is given meat and scraps of meat after an animal was slain and sold. The dogs may even be overweight by eating all the scraps and not necessarily fit.

Why do we say as sick as a dog?

The origin of the phrase ‘sick as a dog’ can be found in the early 1700’s, when it was common to compare undesirable things to dogs. The explanation for this isn’t that people didn’t like dogs, it is that diseases such as the plague were often spread via animals like rats, birds, and unfortunately, dogs.

Where did the expression it’s raining cats and dogs come from?

“Cats and dogs” may come from the Greek expression cata doxa, which means “contrary to experience or belief.” If it is raining cats and dogs, it is raining unusually or unbelievably hard. “Cats and dogs” may be a perversion of the now obsolete word catadupe. In old English, catadupe meant a cataract or waterfall.

What is a sentence for Face the Music?

to accept the unpleasant results of one’s actions. “face the music” means. to accept the unpleasant results of one’s actions. Example Sentences: After drinking alcohol all night, the next morning I had to face the music.

What does fiddle mean?

Definition of fiddle (Entry 2 of 2) intransitive verb. 1 : to play on a fiddle. 2a : to move the hands or fingers restlessly. b : to spend time in aimless or fruitless activity : putter, tinker fiddled around with the engine for hours.

What does the phrase right as rain mean?

In good order or good health, satisfactory, as in He was very ill, but he’s right as rain now, or If she’d only worked on it another week everything would have been as right as rain.

What is the meaning of Butcher?

A butcher is an expert at preparing cuts of meat and poultry in a butcher shop or the meat section of a supermarket. You can also call a person whose job is slaughtering farm animals a butcher. Because this is a fairly bloody, gory occupation, the word is also used to mean a cruel, ruthless murderer.

What tickled pink means?

informal. : very happy or amused I was tickled pink to see her.

Do dogs have a sense of hunger?

In many of the above cases, the underlying mechanism leading to increased hunger is the same: your dog’s body is unable to absorb the nutrients in the food or digest it properly, so their appetite goes into overdrive. They are actually starving no matter how much food they eat, so they compensate by eating everything.

Is there a difference between a fiddle and violin?

But is there a difference between violin playing and fiddle playing? Yes. As a general rule, a violin is used for classical music and a fiddle is used for folk, country, and bluegrass. In the rock and jazz idioms, the terms are used more interchangeably.

Why do we say as happy as Larry?

Answer. Answer: It originates from a boxer called Larry Foley in the 1890s, before boxing was fully legalised. He won the biggest prize of about $150,000 dollars and a newspaper article in New Zealand had the headline “Happy As Larry” and the phrase stuck.